OSHA 30 Hour General Workplace Safety and Health Training

29 CFR 1910 General Industry Safety Standard and Sub-standards

100% Online Responsive Training

Pay just $99.95 for your OSHA 30 Hour General certificate

The OSHA 30-hour General Industry Safety and Health Program provides employees & contractors who have some responsibility for others safety an expanded list of topics associated with workplace hazards in general industry that build upon the 10 hour certification.

The 30 Hour certification provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in the workplace.

The training also provides information regarding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint.

To complete this certification trainees must complete all courses within 90 days of enrollment and pass all quizzes with an 80% pass grade.

Compliant with OSHA Standards

Multiple OSHA 1910 Standards

OSHA 30 Hour General Safety & Health - Curriculum

1. Introduction to OSHA

  • Discuss OSHA’s mission as stated in the OSHact of 1970.
  • Summarize where to find OSHA’s standards in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).
  • Discuss how OSHA enforces standards, including issuing citations and assessing penalties.
  • Describe the various OSHA resources to help employers develop a safe workplace.
  • List and describe the OSHA Alliance Program, SHARP, and VPP opportunities for employers.
  • Discuss employer and employee responsibilities under the OSHAact of 1970.
  • Define and give examples of “recognized hazards.”
  • Describe the various workers’ rights and whistleblower protections.

2. Hazard Communication

  • Describe the basic sections of the HCS 2012 standard.
  • Describe benefits of the Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).
  • Define “hazardous substances” and give examples of physical and health hazards.
  • Describe the chemical effects and four primary routes of entry when employees are exposed.
  • Discuss the “Hierarchy of Controls” for controlling chemical hazards.
  • List the types of chemical containers and the labeling requirements for each type.
  • Describe the nine HCS pictograms and the hazards they represent.
  • Discuss the purpose of the safety data sheet (SDS).
  • Describe the SDS requirements for manufacturers, distributors, importers and employers.
  • List and describe each of the required 16 sections of the SDS.
  • Discuss employee training requirements for the HCS 2012 program.
  • Discuss HCS 2012 requirements on multi-employer worksites.

3. Personal Protective Equipment

  • Describe the general requirement for using PPE in the workplace.
  • Identify the five types of eye and face protection.
  • Identify the two basic types of head protection and the three classes of hard hats.
  • List and give examples of at least five types of foot and leg protection.
  • Describe how safety gloves protect employees.
  • Discuss the importance of using body protection and give examples.
  • Describe the types of hearing protection and the advantages of each.
  • Give examples of hazards from which respiratory protection protects employees.
  • List and describe the use of the four basic types of respirators.
  • Describe the use of non-powered air-purifying respirators (APRs).
  • Describe the use of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs).
  • Describe the use of the supplied-air respirator (SAR) and Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA).
  • Discuss important points for the care, use, and storage of respirators.
  • Describe the use of canisters and the importance of color coding.

4. EAP and Fire Protection: Basic

  • Identify and describe the two primary OSHA electrical safety standards.
  • Describe the benefits of an electrical safety program.
  • Identify at least 10 electrical hazards commonly found in the workplace.
  • Define “volt,” “ampere,” and “ohm.”
  • Discuss the difference between a series and parallel electrical circuit.
  • Describe the factors that cause electrical shocks.
  • Discuss the hazards associated with working around high voltage.
  • Describe the hazards associated with static electricity.
  • Discuss how overload conditions occur and electrical protective devices.
  • List the three factors causing most electrical injuries.
  • Describe the importance of and types of electrical insulation.
  • Describe methods for effectively guarding electrical equipment.
  • Define the term, “grounding,” and give examples.
  • List and give examples of circuit protection devices.
  • Describe general safe work practices when working around electrical circuits.
  • Discuss how to protect against energized parts and unexpected startup.
  • Describe protection while working around overhead power lines
  •  

5. Walking Working Surfaces & Fall Protection

  • Describe the general requirements for good housekeeping practices.
  • List at least five best practices for safe ladder use.
  • Describe the “three-point-control” and correct ladder angle guidelines for portable ladders.
  • Describe at least five guidelines for the safe use of fixed ladders, mobile ladder stands, and platforms.
  • List at least five requirements for the design of standard, spiral, and alternating tread-type stairs.
  • Identify guidelines for the safe use of dockboards.
  • Describe requirements for rope descent system use, capacity, care, and maintenance.
  • Discuss training and retraining requirements for the hazards associated with falls
  • Describe the three primary fall protection systems for use while working at heights.
  • Describe the fall protection systems used to protect employees working around holes, openings, runways and ramps, pits and over dangerous equipment.
  • Describe the safety guidelines while climbing fixed ladders.
  • Describe stairway guardrail, stair rail, and hand rail requirements.
  • Describe the safety requirements while working on low-slope roofs, including the use of designated areas.
  • List the components and describe the requirements for guardrail systems.
  • Describe the fall protection requirements for stairways, handrails, and stair rail systems
  • Describe safe practices when using fixed ladders.
  • Discuss the design and safety requirements for toeboards.

6. Electrical Safety: Basic

  • Identify and describe the two primary OSHA electrical safety standards.
  • Describe the benefits of an electrical safety program.
  • Identify at least 10 electrical hazards commonly found in the workplace.
  • Define “volt,” “ampere,” and “ohm.”
  • Discuss the difference between a series and parallel electrical circuit.
  • Describe the factors that cause electrical shocks.
  • Discuss the hazards associated with working around high voltage.
  • Describe the hazards associated with static electricity.
  • Discuss how overload conditions occur and electrical protective devices.
  • List the three factors causing most electrical injuries.
  • Describe the importance of and types of electrical insulation.
  • Describe methods for effectively guarding electrical equipment.
  • Define the term, “grounding,” and give examples.
  • List and give examples of circuit protection devices.
  • Describe general safe work practices when working around electrical circuits.
  • Discuss how to protect against energized parts and unexpected startup.
  • Describe protection while working around overhead power lines
  •  

7. Ergonomic Hazards in General Industry

  • Define ergonomics and the risks inherent with the worker, task, and environment.
  • Discuss risk factors in the worker including: age, gender, physical activity, strength and anthropometry (scientific study of the measurements & proportions of the human body).
  • Discuss risk factors in the task including: force, vibration, repetition, recovery time, duration twisting, and posture.
  • Discuss risk factors in the environment including: illumination, sound, temperature, and psychosocial.
  • Define and give examples of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MDSs).
  • Describe the “Hierarchy of Controls” and how it relates to ergonomics improvement.
  • Define and give examples of ergonomics “engineering controls.”
  • Define and give examples of ergonomics “administrative controls.”
  • Define and give examples of ergonomics “personal protective equipment.”
  • Describe safe lifting techniques.
  • Describe the steps in prioritizing making ergonomic improvements.

8. Forklift Safety: Basic

  • Describe the use of forklift safety features: backrest extension, overhead guard, mast, and operator restraints.
  • Define and give an example of the stability triangle, fulcrum principle, and center of gravity.
  • Describe the importance of load and forklift moments in calculating safe lifts.
  • Discuss the impact of raising load on forklift stability.
  • Give examples of safely driving forklifts on ramps with empty and full loads.
  • Discuss the two power sources for forklifts.
  • List and describe the requirements for the use of forklift attachments.
  • Describe the four primary workplace conditions making forklift use hazardous.
  • Describe the various questions to ask when conducting forklift pre-use inspections.
  • Describe the safe work practices when traveling with a forklift.
  • Describe the safe work practices for driving forklifts on ramps, onto trucks, trailers, and railroad cars.
  • Discuss the procedures for loading and unloading material loads and personnel using forklifts.
  • Discuss the importance of considering traffic patterns to help prevent accidents.

9. Welding Safety

  • Describe the basic welding process.
  • Define and describe the process of coalescence.
  • Describe and contrast gas welding with electric arc welding.
  • Describe the various components of gas and electric arc welding equipment.
  • List at least five types of welding defects.
  • Discuss the hazards associated with gas and electric arc welding.
  • Describe the importance of considering the location of the welding operation.
  • Discuss fire prevention and protection safe practices and fire watch requirements.
  • Discuss welding requirements when performing hot work operations.
  • Describe cutting safe work practices and precautions.
  • Describe brazing and soldering safe work practices and precautions.
  • List and describe the four primary types of burns that may result from welding.
  • List and describe eye, face, body, leg, and foot personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • Describe PPE recommendations for light, medium and heavy, and overhead welding operations.

10. Confined Space Safety

  • Types of Confined Spaces
  • Basic Terms for Confined Space
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Entry Team Responsibilities
  • Non-Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Confined Space Rescues
  • Hazardous Conditions Inside a Confined Space
  • Confined Space Training Requirements
  • Types of Confined Spaces
  • Basic Terms for Confined Space
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Entry Team Responsibilities
  • Non-Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Confined Space Rescues
  • Hazardous Conditions Inside a Confined Space
  • Confined Space Training Requirements
  • Types of Confined Spaces
  • Basic Terms for Confined Space
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Entry Team Responsibilities
  • Non-Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Confined Space Rescues
  • Hazardous Conditions Inside a Confined Space
  • Confined Space Training Requirement
  • Types of Confined Spaces
  • Basic Terms for Confined Space
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Entry Team Responsibilities
  • Non-Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Confined Space Rescues
  • Hazardous Conditions Inside a Confined Space
  • Confined Space Training Requirement
  • Types of Confined Spaces
  • Basic Terms for Confined Space
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Entry Team Responsibilities
  • Non-Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Confined Space Rescues
  • Hazardous Conditions Inside a Confined Space
  • Confined Space Training Requirement

11. Bloodborne Pathogens

Learn what Bloodborne pathogens are, the diseases they case, how they transmitted, OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogen Standard and who is covered by it.

  • Learn the most common types of bloodborne pathogens including HBV, HCV and HIV.
  • Learn employer responsibilties including the employers control plan, housekeeping, PPE, proper cleaning procesdures and exposure control and incident reporting.

12. Materials Handling Safety

  • Describe the hazards inherent in manual material handling.
  • List factors associated with back injuries.
  • Discuss precautions to take when manually handling materials.
  • Describe the hazards associated with moving and lifting objects.
  • Describe the best practices for stacking materials.
  • Identify the types of PPE to use when manually handling materials.
  • Describe the hazards of loading, transporting, and unloading.
  • Describe precautions to take when moving trailing cables
  • Describe the types of equipment used in mechanical handling.
  • Identify the seven classes of forklifts.
  • Give an example of a diesel, electric, gasoline, and LPS forklifts.
  • Describe Hazard Classes I and II, and give examples.
  • Describe safe practices when traveling when using a forklift.
  • Discuss safe practices when driving on ramps and onto trucks, trailers, and railroad cars.
  • Identify the questions to ask when analyzing a load.
  • Describe requirements for lifting and lowering people using a forklift.
  • Discuss safe work practices related to forklift traffic patterns.
  • Define “rated capacity” and give an example.
  • Discuss general safety measures for crane operation.
  • Describe the hazards of working around a suspended load.
  • Describe crane operator responsibilities while the load is suspended.
  • Discuss the signaling and work area control requirements for operators.
  • Describe the types of slings, related safe practices and uses.
  • Describe the hazards associated with working around conveyors.
  • Discuss the benefits of good housekeeping for material handling.
  • Describe staging hazards and solutions.
  • Describe general storage considerations for indoors and outside storage.
  • Discuss storage and stacking requirements for bagged materials, lumber, and bricks.
  • Discuss storage and stacking requirements for steel, cylindrical material, sand, gravel, and stone.
  • Describe requirements for handling and storing drums.
  • Describe requirements for and storing flammable and combustible liquids

13. Machine Safeguarding

  • Describe the basic requirement for machine guarding.
  • List and give examples of each of the three primary motions of moving parts.
  • List and give examples of each of the four primary machine actions.
  • Describe the hazards from in-running nip points and the three primary types of motions.
  • Describe and give examples of cutting, punching, shearing, and bending actions.
  • Describe the basic requirements for a suitable machine guard.
  • Discuss the guidelines for machine safeguarding training.
  • List and describe the hazards of wearing gloves, loose clothing, jewelry, and long hair when working around rotating parts
  • List and describe the five basic classifications of machine safeguards.
  • List and describe the four types of fixed machine guards.
  • List and describe the six types of machine safeguard devices.
  • Describe machine safeguarding by location and distance.
  • Describe the three basic types of feeding and ejection methods.
  • Discuss the two basic causes for accidents associated with robots in the workplace.
  • Describe the purpose of miscellaneous aids.

14. Electrical Safety Hazards and Controls

  • Give examples of electrical hazards in the workplace.
  • Define “volt,” “ampere,” and “ohm.”
  • Discuss the difference between a series and parallel electrical circuit.
  • Describe the factors that increase the severity of electrical shocks.
  • Discuss the hazards associated with working around high voltage.
  • Describe the three common types of electrical burns.
  • Describe the dangers of arc flash and blast hazards.
  • List the components of the Electrical Safety Model
  • Identify two basic types of electrical wiring hazards.
  • Describe the hazards of exposed electrical parts.
  • Identify and describe the “Restricted Approach Boundary,” “Limited Approach Boundary, and “Arc Flash Boundary.”
  • Discuss hazards associated with electrical overload conditions.
  • Describe the importance of and types of electrical insulation.
  • Describe methods for effectively guarding electrical equipment.
  • Define the term, “grounding,” and give examples.
  • List and give examples of circuit protection devices including Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs).
  • Discuss minimum approach distances when working around conductive objects.
  • Describe general indicators of electrical hazards and give examples.
  • Define and give examples for “risk,” “probability,” and “severity.”
  • Give examples of clues indicating high risk of injury.
  • Describe the primary methods of controlling electrical hazards.
  • List and give examples of circuit protection devices.
  • Compare the hazards and controls for fixed and flexible electrical wiring.
  • Describe general safe work practices when working around electrical circuits.
  • Discuss how to protect against energized parts and unexpected startup.
  • Describe protection while working around overhead power lines.
  • Describe the various types of electrical protective equipment and tools

15.Controlling Hazardous Energy (LOTO)

  • Discuss the purpose and scope of the Energy Control Program.
  • Describe the two states and at least five types of hazardous energy.
  • Give an example of how energy is transformed from one type to another.
  • Discuss the differences among lockout (LO), tagout (TO), and lockout/tagout (LOTO)
  • List the eight exceptions to the requirement to perform lockout/tagout.
  • Describe the various types and criteria for lockout/tagout devices.
  • Describe Energy Control Program training and retraining requirements.
  • Contrast training requirements for authorized, affected, and other employees.
  • Describe the additional training requirements when tagout procedures are used.
  • Discuss training documentation and certification requirements for authorized employees.
  • Describe periodic Energy Control Program inspection requirements.
  • Describe the various types of corrective actions that might be required after inspections.
  • List the seven basic steps in performing lockout tagout.
  • Discuss the process of identifying energy sources and energy-isolating devices.
  • Describe how to properly de-energize equipment and machinery for lockout/tagout.
  • Identify how to properly secure energy-isolating devices.
  • Discuss the importance of dissipating or restraining potential energy.
  • Contrast traditional lockout/tagout with group lockout/tagout procedures.
  • Discuss how to verify equipment isolation.
  • Discuss the procedures for release from lockout/tagout.
  • Describe the proper sequence for lockout/tagout for testing purposes.
  • Discuss the relationship and procedures when working with contractors.

16. Introduction to Safety Supervision

  • Define and discuss the concept of “supervision.”
  • Discuss employer responsibilities as detailed in the OSHAct of 1970.
  • Discuss the four criteria that must be met before OSHA can prove an OSHAct violation.
  • Describe employee protected activities under the Whistleblower Act.
  • Describe the supervisor’s position as an “agent of the employer.”
  • Describe the five hazard MEEPS categories.
  • Discuss the four primary tools supervisors can use to identify hazards
  • Contrast surface and root causes.
  • List and give examples of the Hierarchy of Controls.
  • Discuss supervisor responsibilities to provide safety training.
  • List and describe the steps in the On-The-Job training (OJT) process.
  • Define and give examples of accountability.
  • Discuss what supervisors must first do before considering discipline.
  • List and describe the six basic elements of an effective accountability system.
  • List and give examples of the four categories of physical resources.
  • Describe how supervisors can provide psychosocial support.
  • Describe the factors that increase stress in the workplace.
  • Identify the leadership style that best supports the psychosocial environment.

17. Introduction to Safety Leadership

  • Define leadership and describe how it differs from management.
  • List and give examples of John Maxwell’s Five Levels of Leadership.
  • Discuss how corporate culture affects safety leadership.
  • Describe “Tough-Coercive,” “Tough-Controlling,” and “Tough-Caring” leadership styles.
  • Define commitment and how it is demonstrated in the workplace.
  • Discuss how leadership impacts the design of mission and vision statements.
  • Describe how leadership affects proactive and reactive safety.
  • Describe how leaders demonstrate commitment to safety and health.
  • Describe how leaders develop goals and objectives.
  • Discuss the importance of meeting leadership responsibilities in allocating resources.
  • Discuss the successful leadership impacts involvement and participation in safety.
  • Describe how leadership serves to best identify, control, and eliminate hazards.
  • Describe how successful leadership is exhibited in training and other safety programs.

18. Introduction to Safety Accountability

  • Contrast the difference between “responsibility” and “accountability.”
  • List the six elements of an effective safety accountability program.
  • Discuss why it is important to have formal standards of performance in a safety management system.
  • Give examples of providing adequate resources and psychosocial support.
  • Give examples of key performance indicators (KPIs) for managers, supervisors, and employees.
  • Discuss the criteria required before holding employees accountable in safety is appropriate.
  • Discuss the concept of “cause and effect” and how it applies to safety accountability.
  • Define and give examples of positive/negative reinforcement and positive/negative punishment.
  • Discuss why “ignoring” as a consequence, is so damaging to an effective safety culture.

19. Introduction to Safety Recognition

  • Describe various extrinsic and intrinsic rewards.
  • Describe the concept that leaders “get what they give.”
  • Contrast proactive and reactive recognition programs.
  • Give examples of successful proactive recognition programs.
  • List and describe the two basic types of operant conditioning.
  • Contrast positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement.
  • Contrast positive and negative punishment.
  • Describe the importance of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as it relates to recognition.
  • List and give examples of at least five Rules for Recognition.
  • Discuss the safety “Butterfly Effect” and it’s potential impact on the safety culture.
  • Discuss why ignoring co-workers is such a negative form of recognition.
  • List and give examples of at least five ideas for positive recognition and rewards.

20. Introduction to Safety Training

  • Define “education,” “instruction,” and “training” and how they relate to each other.
  • Describe the strategies to increase safety knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs).
  • Describe documentation requirements and best practices for instruction and technical safety training.
  • List at least five topics that are commonly taught using only instruction and five topics the require technical safety training.
  • Describe ASSE/ANSI 490.1 minimum criteria for a safety training program.
  • Describe OSHA 1910.120, Appendix A, 10 suggested training plan core elements.
  • Discuss the ASSE/ANSI 490.1 criteria for safety instructor qualifications.
  • Describe the three OSHA rule 1910.120 criteria determining instructor competency.
  • Discuss the major questions to ask to develop safety training most effectively.
  • Discuss the importance of conducting supervisor and manager-level safety training.
  • Contrast the characteristics of training and learning goals and objectives.
  • Describe at least three safety training presentation strategies.
  • Describe the importance of skills demonstrations and retraining.
  • List important information to include in technical safety training certification.

21. Introduction to Hazard Controls

  • Define and give examples of “hazards,” and “exposures.”
  • Describe the three basic types of OSHA-recognized hazards: industry, employer, and common sense recognition.
  • Describe the three basic types of exposure to hazards: physical, environmental, and potential exposure.
  • List and give examples of each of the five general hazard areas: materials, equipment, environment, people, and system.
  • List and give examples of at least five of the 13 types of occupational hazards.
  • List each of the five hazard control strategies within the Hierarchy of Controls.
  • Describe the hazard control strategies that eliminate or mitigate hazards.
  • Describe the hazard control strategies that eliminate or mitigate exposure to hazards.
  • Describe and give examples of interim control measures.
  • Describe the importance of developing and maintaining preventive and corrective maintenance programs.
  • Discuss ways to track the identification and control of hazards.

22. Introduction to Job Hazard Analysis

  • Describe each section of the basic Job Hazard Analysis format.
  • Define and discuss the importance of analyzing hazards and behaviors in a job.
  • Describe the process of risk analysis and risk assessment matrix as applied to the JHA.
  • Identify the three factors used in calculating risk and prioritizing jobs.
  • Describe the characteristics of a well-written step in a JHA.
  • Describe the factors to consider when identifying the hazards in a job.
  • List at least five of the common hazards found in the workplace.
  • Describe the five basic hazard control strategies in the Hierarchy of Controls.
  • Give examples of each elimination, substitution, engineering, administrative and PPE control strategies.
  • Discuss the important point to remember when writing about hazards and preventive measures.
  • Give an example of a well-written safe job procedure.
  • Describe the importance of the team approach to improve the JHA process.
  • List and discuss JHA team responsibilities.

23. Managing Safety & Health in General Industry

  • List the seven essential elements of an effective safety and health program.
  • Describe ways in which management can demonstrate leadership in safety.
  • Discuss the reasons why employee participation in safety improvement is important.
  • Describe hazard identification and assessment methods.
  • Describe hazard prevention and control methods.
  • Discuss the importance of an effective safety education and training program.
  • Describe safety and health program evaluation and continuous improvement.
  • Discuss the importance of multi-employer communication and coordination.
  • List and discuss the benefits of an effective safety and health program.
  • Give examples of safety policies, goals, and objectives.
  • Discuss steps to increase worker participation in safety.
  • Describe recordkeeping, inspection and investigation activities that identify hazards.
  • Describe the Hierarchy of Controls strategy for hazard prevention and control.
  • Describe the importance of educating management and employees on their safety roles.
  • Define and give examples of leading and lagging indicators when evaluating safety performance.
  • Discuss effective safety communication and coordination methods.
  • Define and describe how the concepts of “value” and “priorities” differ.
  • Describe the importance of leading by example.
  • List and describe the five areas in which managers and supervisors can demonstrate safety leadership and commitment.
  • Discuss strategies that can help ensure effective reporting of hazards, near-misses, incidents and injury accidents.
  • Describe the two primary forms of safety education: general instruction and technical training.
  • Discuss the two ways to properly document safety instruction and technical training.
  • Discuss the importance of using checklists when conducting safety inspections.
  • List and describe strategies to collect hazard control ideas.
  • List and describe the steps in Deming’s PDSA Cycle.
  • Describe the three primary safety programs to help management prepare for emergencies.
  • Describe ways to partner with OSHA to help improve the company’s safety and health program

24. Planning for Workplace Emergencies

  • List key elements in the Emergency Action Plan (EAP).
  • Discuss reporting requirements under the EAP.
  • Describe a typical evacuation procedure if a fire occurs.
  • Describe evacuation warden requirements and duties.
  • Discuss requirements for employees who do not evacuate.
  • Discuss requirements for accounting for employees and assembly areas.
  • Describe how individuals can respond in an active shooter emergency.
  • Identify important points when coordinating with fire, rescue, and medical services.
  • Define the terms “exit,” “exit access,” and “exit discharge.”
  • Describe the basic requirements for exit design, location, and use.
  • Discuss the factors that determine the number of exits.
  • Describe the requirements for door swing, locking, and outside exit doors.
  • Describe the importance of training and retraining proper use of exits during emergencies.
  • Define and describe how the concepts of “value” and “priorities” differ.
  • Describe the importance of leading by example.
  • List and describe the five areas in which managers and supervisors can demonstrate safety leadership and commitment.
  • Discuss strategies that can help ensure effective reporting of hazards, near-misses, incidents and injury accidents.
  • Describe the two primary forms of safety education: general instruction and technical training.
  • Discuss the two ways to properly document safety instruction and technical training.
  • Discuss the importance of using checklists when conducting safety inspections.
  • List and describe strategies to collect hazard control ideas.
  • List and describe the steps in Deming’s PDSA Cycle.
  • Describe the three primary safety programs to help management prepare for emergencies.
  • Describe ways to partner with OSHA to help improve the company’s safety and health program

30 HOURS

Training Time

ASSESSMENTS

58 Quizzes

OSHA Certificate of Compliance

Instant access and email delivery means you’re OSHA 30 hour compliant immediately. Your certificate will be permanently stored in your account where it can be verified or re-printed at any time.

OSHA 10 Construction Certificate Sample
Click to zoom

OSHA Information and Disclaimer

General Industry (Part 1910)
Scroll to Top