OSHA Emergency Action and Fire Prevention Plans

1910.38 Emergency Action Plans / 1910.39 Fire Prevention Plans

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Pay just $18.95 for your OSHA certificate AFTER you complete the training.

This course introduces you to the OSHA requirements for elements of an effective Emergency Action Plan (EAP) and Fire Prevention Plan (FPP). Employers are required to have these two safety plans in place to help ensure they are prepared in emergency situations.

Compliant with OSHA Standard

1910.38 Emergency Action Plans / 1910.39 Fire Prevention Plans

Emergency Action and Fire Prevention Plans - Curriculum

Emergency Action Plans (EAP)

In this lesson, you will learn about what an EAP is and why it is an important part of the OSHA standard.

In this lesson, you will become familiar with the key elements required in an emergency action plan and what must be included in each element.

In this lesson, you will learn about the minimum requirements and processes for reporting workplace emergencies.

In this lesson you will learn about OSHA’s requirements relating to emergency evacuation procedures.

In this lesson you will learn about the requirements for exit routes including positioning and signage.

In this lesson you will learn about how to safely assist other employees to escape in specific circumstances.

In this lesson you will learn about requirements for employees who do not evacuate,

In this lesson you will learn about requirements for accounting for employees and assembly areas.

In this lesson you will learn about correct protocol when coordinating with fire, rescue, and medical services.

Fire Prevention Plans (FPP)

In this lesson you will learn about the basics of the OSHA Fire Prevention Plan legislation and standards.

In this lesson you will learn about employer, supervisor, and employee responsibilities relating to the fire prevention plan.

In this lesson you will learn about the components required in a written fire prevention plan.

In this lesson you will learn about best practices when creating fire prevention plans.

In this lesson you will learn about various fire hazards you may encounter in the workplace.

In this lesson you will learn about the two primary types of fire extinguishing systems and the additional systems you may encounter.

In this lesson you will learn the correct PASS method for using fire extinguishers.

In this lesson you will learn about the OSHA Fire Prevention Plan education and training requirements,

1 HOUR

Training Time

ASSESSMENTS

Two Quizzes

OSHA Certificate of Compliance

After successfully completing the training, you can buy the official OSHA Emergency Action and Fire Prevention Plans Certificate for just $18.95. 

Instant access and email delivery means you’re OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200 compliant immediately. Your certificate will be permanently stored in your account where it can be verified or re-printed at any time.

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OSHA Information and Disclaimer

EAP

  • Part Number:
    1910
  • Part Number Title:
    Occupational Safety and Health Standards
  • Subpart:
    1910 Subpart E
  • Subpart Title:
    Exit Routes and Emergency Planning
  • Standard Number:
  • Title:
    Emergency action plans.
  • GPO Source:
1910.38(a)
Application. An employer must have an emergency action plan whenever an OSHA standard in this part requires one. The requirements in this section apply to each such emergency action plan.
1910.38(b)
Written and oral emergency action plans. An emergency action plan must be in writing, kept in the workplace, and available to employees for review. However, an employer with 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to employees.
1910.38(c)
Minimum elements of an emergency action plan. An emergency action plan must include at a minimum:
1910.38(c)(1)
Procedures for reporting a fire or other emergency;
1910.38(c)(2)
Procedures for emergency evacuation, including type of evacuation and exit route assignments;
1910.38(c)(3)
Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate;
1910.38(c)(4)
Procedures to account for all employees after evacuation;
1910.38(c)(5)
Procedures to be followed by employees performing rescue or medical duties; and
1910.38(c)(6)
The name or job title of every employee who may be contacted by employees who need more information about the plan or an explanation of their duties under the plan.
1910.38(d)
Employee alarm system. An employer must have and maintain an employee alarm system. The employee alarm system must use a distinctive signal for each purpose and comply with the requirements in § 1910.165.
1910.38(e)
Training. An employer must designate and train employees to assist in a safe and orderly evacuation of other employees.
1910.38(f)
Review of emergency action plan. An employer must review the emergency action plan with each employee covered by the plan:
1910.38(f)(1)
When the plan is developed or the employee is assigned initially to a job;
1910.38(f)(2)
When the employee’s responsibilities under the plan change; and
1910.38(f)(3)
When the plan is changed.
[45 FR 60703, Sept. 12, 1980; FR 67 67963, Nov. 7, 2002]

FPP

 

  • Part Number:
    1910
  • Part Number Title:
    Occupational Safety and Health Standards
  • Subpart:
    1910 Subpart E
  • Subpart Title:
    Exit Routes and Emergency Planning
  • Standard Number:
  • Title:
    Fire prevention plans.
  • GPO Source:
1910.39(a)
Application. An employer must have a fire prevention plan when an OSHA standard in this part requires one. The requirements in this section apply to each such fire prevention plan.
1910.39(b)
Written and oral fire prevention plans. A fire prevention plan must be in writing, be kept in the workplace, and be made available to employees for review. However, an employer with 10 or fewer employees may communicate the plan orally to employees.
1910.39(c)
Minimum elements of a fire prevention plan. A fire prevention plan must include:
1910.39(c)(1)
A list of all major fire hazards, proper handling and storage procedures for hazardous materials, potential ignition sources and their control, and the type of fire protection equipment necessary to control each major hazard;
1910.39(c)(2)
Procedures to control accumulations of flammable and combustible waste materials;
1910.39(c)(3)
Procedures for regular maintenance of safeguards installed on heat-producing equipment to prevent the accidental ignition of combustible materials;
1910.39(c)(4)
The name or job title of employees responsible for maintaining equipment to prevent or control sources of ignition or fires; and
1910.39(c)(5)
The name or job title of employees responsible for the control of fuel source hazards.
1910.39(d)
Employee information. An employer must inform employees upon initial assignment to a job of the fire hazards to which they are exposed. An employer must also review with each employee those parts of the fire prevention plan necessary for self-protection.
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